Managing Make-to-Stock and the Concept of Make-to-Availability (Chapter 10 of Theory of Constraints Handbook)

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This is an individual chapter of Theory of Constraints Handbook. This chapter highlights a considerable change in the TOC approach relating to make-to-stock. Among the elements of the change is refraining from determining a due date for a production order that is for stock. Another considerable change is to acknowledge the distinction in between make-to-stock (MTS) and make-to-availability (MTA). MTA is a commitment to keep availability of stock at all times. This suggests adopting a marketing method paired with functional capability. Certainly MTA suggests producing to stock, however not every make-to-stock order supports the dedication of complete availability at all times. The chapter deals with the existing misunderstanding of projections, and establishes the domino effect logic behind the needed planning and execution rules for MTA. The regard to âEUR˜target levelâEUR ™ explains the stock buffer, which is different than the regular TOC regard to âEUR˜time buffer.âEUR ™ The planning choices are focused at taking care of the inventory in the system. The matched buffer management rules figure out the genuine top priorities in the dispensary floor. The chapter discusses various MTA environments, like vendor-managed-inventory (VMI) and handling components for MTA, their associated problems and the TOC option for them. Likewise discussed is the combined environment where make-to-order and make-to-availability exist side-by-side. The chapter ends by highlighting particular MTS environments that are not MTA.

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